Cooling Treatment Improves Survival Without Brain Damage in Later Childhood
Read the full article Cooling Treatment Improves Survival Without Brain Damage in Later Childhood at NeuroscienceNews.com.
The cooling of newborn babies suffering from perinatal asphyxia – a lack of oxygen at the time of birth – significantly increases their chance of survival without brain damage to later childhood (age six to seven years), according to a Medical Research Council (MRC) funded clinical trial by a team of researchers from the universities of Bristol, Oxford, Leeds, University College London, Imperial College London, Queen’s University Belfast and Homerton University Hospital, London.
The research is in New England Journal of Medicine. (full access paywall)
Research: “Effects of Hypothermia for Perinatal Asphyxia on Childhood Outcomes” by Denis Azzopardi, M.D., Brenda Strohm, R.N., Neil Marlow, D.M., Peter Brocklehurst, F.F.P.H., Aniko Deierl, M.D., Ph.D., Oya Eddama, Ph.D., Julia Goodwin, Ph.D., Henry L. Halliday, M.D., Edmund Juszczak, M.Sc., Olga Kapellou, M.D., Malcolm Levene, M.D., Louise Linsell, M.Sc., Omar Omar, M.Sc., Marianne Thoresen, M.D., Ph.D., Nora Tusor, M.D., Andrew Whitelaw, M.D., and A. David Edwards, D.Sc. for the TOBY Study Group in New England Journal of Medicine. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1315788
Image: Newborn baby being cooled (circulating cold water in cooling jacket) during transport to Bristol after lack of oxygen at birth Credit Marianne Thoresen.

Cooling Treatment Improves Survival Without Brain Damage in Later Childhood

Read the full article Cooling Treatment Improves Survival Without Brain Damage in Later Childhood at NeuroscienceNews.com.

The cooling of newborn babies suffering from perinatal asphyxia – a lack of oxygen at the time of birth – significantly increases their chance of survival without brain damage to later childhood (age six to seven years), according to a Medical Research Council (MRC) funded clinical trial by a team of researchers from the universities of Bristol, Oxford, Leeds, University College London, Imperial College London, Queen’s University Belfast and Homerton University Hospital, London.

The research is in New England Journal of Medicine. (full access paywall)

Research: “Effects of Hypothermia for Perinatal Asphyxia on Childhood Outcomes” by Denis Azzopardi, M.D., Brenda Strohm, R.N., Neil Marlow, D.M., Peter Brocklehurst, F.F.P.H., Aniko Deierl, M.D., Ph.D., Oya Eddama, Ph.D., Julia Goodwin, Ph.D., Henry L. Halliday, M.D., Edmund Juszczak, M.Sc., Olga Kapellou, M.D., Malcolm Levene, M.D., Louise Linsell, M.Sc., Omar Omar, M.Sc., Marianne Thoresen, M.D., Ph.D., Nora Tusor, M.D., Andrew Whitelaw, M.D., and A. David Edwards, D.Sc. for the TOBY Study Group in New England Journal of Medicine. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1315788

Image: Newborn baby being cooled (circulating cold water in cooling jacket) during transport to Bristol after lack of oxygen at birth Credit Marianne Thoresen.